GOD Remembers Noah – The Rains Dry Up (G-8-HBS)

THE RAINS CEASE

We are given the record not only of the building up of the Flood but also of the prevailing and now the assuaging of the Flood.

We are told that “God remembered Noah”—how lovely—and that “God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters assuaged.” It did not happen just overnight. The buildup of the waters took over 150 days, and then there were 261 days in the assuaging.

That looks to me like it is something more than just a local flood.

Genesis 8:1-12 KJV

[1] And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters asswaged;

[2] The fountains also of the deep and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained;

[3] And the waters returned from off the earth continually: and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated.

[4] And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.

[5] And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month: in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen.

[6] And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:

[7] And he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth.

[8] Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground;

[9] But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark.

[10] And he stayed yet other seven days; and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark;

[11] And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off: so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.

[12] And he stayed yet other seven days; and sent forth the dove; which returned not again unto him any more.

Genesis 8:1

And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters asswaged;


Then God remembered Noah.

God’s covenant with Noah brought provision and protection in the midst of severe judgment. The remnant was preserved and God initiated steps toward reestablishing the created order on earth.

the waters subsided.

God used the wind to dry the ground; evaporation returned water to the atmosphere. We are given the record not only of the building up of the Flood but also of the prevailing and now the assuaging of the Flood.

We are told that “God remembered Noah”—how lovely—and that “God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters assuaged.” It did not happen just overnight. The buildup of the waters took over 150 days, and then there were 261 days in the assuaging.

Genesis 8:2

The fountains also of the deep and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained;


The fountains also of the deep, and the windows of heaven, were stopped,….

The passages which let out the subterraneous waters in great quantity upon the earth, and the clouds of heaven, which poured down water upon it like spouts, were stopped from sending forth any more, as they had from the first of the flood unto one hundred and fifty days from thence.

And the rain from heaven was restrained:

This seems to confirm what has been before observed, that after the rain of forty days and nights it ceased not to rain, more or less, though not so vehemently, until the end of an hundred and fifty days, and then it entirely ceased.

Genesis 8:3

And the waters returned from off the earth continually: and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated.


And the waters returned from off the earth continually,….

Or “going and returning”; they went off from the earth, and returned to their proper places appointed for them; some were dried up by the wind, and exhaled by the sun into the air: and others returned to their channels and cavities in the earth, or soaked into it:

And after the end of the hundred and fifty days, the waters were abated; Or began to abate, which days are to be reckoned from the beginning of the flood, including the forty days’ rain.

From the time of the ceasing of it, so that there were from the beginning of the flood one hundred and ninety days, six months, and ten days of the year of the flood now past.

Genesis 8:4

And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.


And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month,….

That is, five months after the flood began, and when the waters began to decrease; for this is not the seventh month of the flood, which lasted only five months, but of the year; the mountains of Ararat.

These were in the region of the Caucasus, also known as ancient Urartu, where the elevation exceeded 17,000 feet.

Genesis 8:5

And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month: in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen.


And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month,….

The decrease of the waters was for wise reasons exceedingly slow and gradual – the period of their return being nearly twice as long as that of their rise.

In the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen; not the tenth month of the flood, but of the year, the tenth from when the rain began.

Genesis 8:6

And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:


It is easy to imagine the ardent longing Noah and his family must have felt to enjoy again the sight of land as well as breathe the fresh air.

And it was perfectly consistent with faith and patience to make inquiries whether the earth was yet ready. We could say that this is the beginning of the end of the Flood. Notice what Noah does:

Genesis 8:7

And he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth.


The smell of carrion would allure it to remain if the earth were in a habitable state. But it kept hovering about the spot, and, being a solitary bird, probably perched on the covering.

Genesis 8:8

Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground;


Also he sent forth a dove from him,….

Frankly, Noah becomes a bird-watcher. He sends out these two birds, the raven and the dove. Seven days after he had sent out the raven, as in Genesis 8:10.

to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground; for the dove is a creature that delights in cleanness, flies low, and goes far off, so that if it returned not again, he might conclude that the waters were gone off the earth.

But being a sociable creature, and familiar to men, and especially loving to its mate, if they were not gone off, it would certainly return again.

Genesis 8:9

But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark.


But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark,….

It being a creature that feeds upon seeds it picks off from the ground, and loving cleanness, it could find no place where it could alight, and have food to live upon, and retain its cleanness; for though the tops of the mountains were clear of the waters, yet they might be muddy and filthy with what the waters had raised up in them, or left upon them; and therefore it returned to Noah again, and not only like the raven unto the ark, but into it.

For the waters were on the face of the whole earth: there was no place dry, and so neither food nor footing for this creature.

Which was an emblem of a sensible sinner, who finds no rest in anything short of Christ; not in worldly enjoyments; nor in external duties, not in hearing, reading, praying, fasting, nor in external humiliation and tears; nor in the law, and in the works of it; nor in natural descent, nor in education principles, nor in a profession of religion, and subjection to ordinances.

Only in Christ, where it finds rest from the burden and guilt of sin, and the tyrannical power of it; from the bondage, curse, and condemnation of the law, and from a sense of divine wrath and fear of it; and though not from afflictions, yet it finds rest in Christ amidst them.

Then he put forth his hand and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark: she hovered about it, and got near the window, which Noah opened and took her in; Which may represent the gracious reception sensible souls meet with from Christ, who apply to him.

He kindly embraces them, and they find room in His heart and affections, fulness of everything they want, and security from all danger.

Genesis 8:10

And he stayed yet other seven days; and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark;


And he stayed yet other seven days,….

As he had stayed seven days between the sending out of the raven and the dove, so he stayed seven days more after he had sent out the dove, and it returned to him, waiting patiently for his deliverance, and the signs of it; though he could have been glad to have known its near approach, for which he made the experiments be did.

And again he sent forth the dove out of the ark; very probably the selfsame dove he had sent out before.

Genesis 8:11

And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off: so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.


And the dove came in to him in the evening,….

It having been out all day delighting itself in a free air, and perching upon the trees, but yet not finding sufficient food, or a proper lodging, it returned to Noah at the evening for food and dwelling in the ark: and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf plucked off.

Which might easily be done, and even an “olive branch”, as the word sometimes signifies, and is by some rendered; for it being now the summer season, young branches sprouted out, which being tender, were easily cropped.

So Noah knew the waters were abated from off the earth.

By this he perceived not only that they were gone off the mountains, but the lower grounds, at least the hills on which olive trees delight to grow; and yet that they were only abated, and not entirely gone off, since the dove returned to him.

This dove sent out the second time, and returning, may be considered as an emblem of a Gospel minister, comparable to a dove, for the dove like gifts of the Spirit of God, by which he is qualified for his work, and for his simplicity, harmlessness, meekness, and humility.

The olive leaf in its mouth may be an emblem of the Gospel, which is from Christ, the good olive; is the Gospel of peace, which an olive branch is a symbol of, proclaiming and publishing peace and reconciliation by Christ.

And as that is ever green, the Gospel always continues, and is the everlasting Gospel, and which was brought, and more fully and clearly dispensed in the evening of the world.

And by it, it is known that the waters of divine wrath are assuaged, and the people of God may be assured they will never return to come upon them.

Genesis 8:12

And he stayed yet other seven days; and sent forth the dove; which returned not again unto him any more.


  • And he stayed yet other seven days,….
  • After the dove had returned:
  • and sent forth the dove;
  • the same dove again:
  • which returned not again unto him any more:
  • the earth being dry, it found rest for the sole of its feet, sufficient food to eat, and a proper place for its habitation; and liking to be at liberty, and in the open air, chose not to return to the ark, even though its mate was there:

I want you to see a great spiritual truth that we have here in the eighth chapter in this account of the raven and the dove. After Noah had spent over a year in the ark, he sent forth a raven, and the raven never came back.

But the dove kept coming back and even brought in its beak a little bit of greenery, an olive leaf. I do not know why the dove and olive leaf have always been symbolic of peace, but they are.

I cannot quite see that that is exactly the message of the dove’s second return. But when the dove did not return at all, that was the sign that the judgment was over and that peace had returned to the earth.

But, of course, man going out of the ark is the same type of man that all the sons of Adam were who had provoked the Flood as a judgment from God in the first place.

You are going to see that there is not too much improvement in man after the Flood; in fact, there is none whatsoever. There is a great spiritual lesson here which I would not have you miss for anything in the world.

Noah is engaged here in “birdwatching.” He sends out the raven, and the raven does not come back.

Why didn’t that raven come back?

You must recognize what that raven eats—it feeds on carrion. There was a whole lot of flesh of dead animals floating around after the Flood, and that was the kind of thing this old crow ate.

He did not return to the ark because he was really going to a feast, and he was having a very wonderful time. The raven was classified as an unclean bird, by the way.

The dove is a clean bird and is so listed later on in Scripture. Remember that Noah took into the ark both the clean and the unclean animals.

The dove brought back information: it was a regular homing pigeon. With the dove’s second trip, Noah was now a confirmed birdwatcher—and the dove brought back evidence that the dry land was appearing.

The third time, the dove did not return, and Noah knew that the waters of judgment were gone. I have said before that all great truths of the Bible are germane in Genesis.

The Bible teaches that the believer has two natures, an old and a new nature: “Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new” (2 Cor. 5:17).

The clean and the unclean are together. You and I as believers have these two natures. Our Lord said: “That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit” (John 3:6).

And Paul writes: “for I knew that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not” (Rom. 7:18).

Paul spoke of a struggle between the two natures. And there is a struggle today between the old nature and the new nature of a believer.

The raven went out into a judged world, but he found a feast in the dead carcass because that is the thing he lived on.

The bloated carcass of an elephant would have made him a banquet; I tell you, it would have been for him a bacchanalian orgy. Back and forth, he restlessly went up and down.

May I say to you, that is the picture of the old nature; the old nature is like that raven. The old nature loves the things of the world and feasts on them.

That is the reason so many people watch television on Sunday night and do not go to church. Don’t tell me that you have some good excuse for that.

You do have an old nature, but that is no excuse because you ought not to be living in the old nature. The dove went out into a judged world, but she found no rest, no satisfaction, and she returned to the ark.

The dove represents the believer in the world. The old raven went out into the world and loved it.

When he found that old carcass, he probably thought the Millennium had arrived!

You see, it is a matter of viewpoint. A professor said to me, “This matter of what’s right and wrong is relative.”

He’s right; it is. It is what God says is right, and it is what the professor says is wrong—and he does not find very much that is wrong, by the way. What God says is wrong is wrong.

The believer is told, “Love not the world, neither the things that are in the world . . .” (1 John 2:15). You and I are living in a judged world today. We are in the world, but not of it.

We are to use it, but not abuse it. We are not to fall in love with it, but we are to attempt to win the lost in this world and get out the Word of God.

Our Lord told us, “. . . Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature” (Mark 16:15). Let’s take care of our job down here and get out the Word of God—that is the important thing.

The dove recognized what kind of a world she was in, and she found no rest. She found rest only in the ark, and that ark sets forth Christ, if you please.

Let me ask you these very personal question:

What kind of bird are you?

Are you a raven or a dove?

If you are a child of God, you have both natures—but which one are you living in today?

Do you love the things of God, or don’t you?

I hope that you have really enjoyed this post,

Please Leave All Comments in the Comment Box Below

 


2 thoughts on “GOD Remembers Noah – The Rains Dry Up (G-8-HBS)

  1. One of my first memories as a child learning about the Bible, was Noah sending out the dove to find dry land. 

    And the the rainbow as a sign from God at the end of the flood. And this beautiful Bible story is still being shared around the world today. 

    This is a timely reminder about the greatness of God and how he looks after us and those that obey him.

    1. Hello Again,

      Thank you for another comment on this website.

      Genesis 9:16

      And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.

      Genesis 9:17
      And God said unto Noah, This is the token of the covenant, which I have established between me and all flesh that is upon the earth.

      I couldn’t agree more.
      Have A Blessed Day,
      Jerry

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